Moriah College rejects all discrimination against LGBTIQ staff and students

Moriah College’s statement on discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

Moriah College logo cropped.jpg

Aleph Melbourne warmly welcomes Moriah College’s statement rejecting all legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students and staff.

Further to their statement “We expect staff to act publicly in a manner that is not inconsistent with the ethos, tenets and values of the school.” the school advises “that Moriah’s expectations are the same for, and of, all staff”.

See our table of responses from Jewish schools across Australia.

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Jewish community responses to religious discrimination in schools

Jewish Community responses to the removal of discrimination against staff and students at religious schools.

This table will be updated as further details come to hand.
Last update: 5:54pm 04-Dec-2018

Organisation (click for statement)StateRemove exemptions
Bialik CollegeVIC
The King David SchoolVIC
Mount Scopus Memorial CollegeVIC
Leibler Yavneh CollegeVIC
Mount Sinai CollegeNSW
Emanuel SchoolNSW
Institute for Judaism and CivilisationVIC
Aleph MelbourneVIC
Sholem Aleichem CollegeVIC
Moriah CollegeNSW
United Jewish Education BoardVIC
Yeshivah & Beth Rivkah CollegesVIC
NSW Board of Jewish EducationNSW
Board of Progressive Jewish EducationNSW
Carmel SchoolWA
Sinai CollegeQLD

Sholem Aleichem College rejects discrimination against LGBTIQ staff and students

Sholem Alecichem College rejects discrimination on the grounds of sexuality or gender identity.

Sholem Aleichem College logoAleph Melbourne warmly welcomes Sholem Aleichem College’s statement rejecting legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students and staff.

See our table of responses from Jewish schools across Australia.

20181018 Sholem Aleichem College statement

ABC RN Roundtable: Discrimination & faith based schools

Discrimination & faith based schools

Sunday 25 November 2018 9:30AM (view full episode)

Religious schools signsA Senate inquiry looking into the the issue of whether faith-based schools should be allowed to discriminate against students, teachers and staff is due to report on Monday.

It’s examining whether exemptions which allow religious schools the right expel same sex students and dismiss gay teachers should stay in place.

The Prime Minister Scott Morrison has promised amendments to discrimination law to make clear no student at religious school should be expelled on the basis of their sexuality.

Guests:

Michael Kirby, former High Court Judge

Jeremy Stowe-Lindner, Principal of Bialik College, Melbourne

Abdullah Khan, Principal of the Australian Islamic College (Perth & Adelaide) and Chair of the Islamic Schools Association of Australia

Mark Spencer, Executive Officer Policy, Governance and Staff Relations at Christian Schools Australia

Mount Scopus calls for removal of legislation allowing exclusion of students and staff on basis of sexuality

Mount Scopus Memorial College calls for the removal of discrimination against staff and students on the basis of sexual orientation.

Mount Scopus Memorial College

Aleph Melbourne warmly welcomes Mount Scopus Memorial College’s submission to the inquiry into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers and staff.

Submissions to the inquiry are open until November 26 2018

See our table of responses from Jewish schools across Australia.

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Aleph Melbourne submission to inquiry into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers and staff

Aleph Melbourne opposes discrimination against students and staff of educational instutions on the grounds of LGBTIQ status. This is our submission to the senate inquiry.

Aleph Melbourne’s submission to the inquiry into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers and staff.

See our table of responses from Jewish schools across Australia.

Aleph_Melbourne_submission_to_inquiry

The King David School calls for all discrimination against students, parents and staff to be removed

King David School says discrimination against staff, parents and students on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation is unacceptable.

King David School logo

Aleph Melbourne welcomes The King David School’s submission to the inquiry into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers and staff.

Submissions to the inquiry are open until November 26 2018.

See our table of responses from Jewish schools across Australia.

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Bialik College calls for religious exemptions allowing LGBTIQ students, teachers and staff to be excluded to be scrapped

Bialik College says discrimination against staff, students and teachers on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation is unacceptable.

Bialik College

Aleph Melbourne welcomes Bialik College’s submission to the Senate inquiry into legislative exemptions that allow faith-based educational institutions to discriminate against students, teachers and staff.

Submissions to the inquiry are open until November 26 2018.

See our table of responses from Jewish schools across Australia.

 

20181119-Bialik-College-Submission-to-Discrimination-Inquiry

 

ECAJ submission to the Senate Committee on the Exposure Draft of Human Rights and Anti-Discrimination Bill 2012

The Executive Council of Australian Jewry submitted a response to the Senate Committee inquiry on the Exposure Draft of Human Rights and Anti-Discrimination Bill 2012.

All submissions to this Senate inquiry are online here.  The submission by the ECAJ is available on the Senate site (#242) and the ECAJ site.

The following paragraph on page 6 of the submission (emphasis added) is of particular relevance:

Whilst there are good, evidence-based policy reasons to have legislation in place which prohibits conduct that offends, insults, humiliates or intimidates others because of other attributes, especially sexual orientation and gender identity, we believe that this should take the form of anti-vilification, not anti-discrimination, legislation and such legislation should include the same objective element as applies when the protected attribute is race. If, as we believe is the case, the Commonwealth lacks the constitutional power to enact anti-vilification legislation to protect attributes other than race, then it should be left to the States and Territories to do so, and the focus of government should be to achieve uniformity in such legislation across Australia.

 

AJN Letters: Maurice Sendak + Chaim Ingram on Marriage Equality – May 18 2012

18 May 2012
The Australian Jewish News Melbourne edition

Letters to the editor should be no more than 250 words and may be edited for length and content. Only letters sent to letters@jewishnews.net.au will be considered for publication. Please supply an address and daytime phone number for verification.


Wild thing made my heart sing

THE death of Maurice Sendak takes me back to my childhood, on a journey that many of us could share similarly. I recall turning the pages of his Wild Things book with wonderment and enjoying the scariness of the story and illustrations.

Not knowing until today that Sendak was of Jewish heritage, it is but one of the many things about him of which I was previously unaware. Another is that he had a male partner of 50 years, Eugene Glynn, who pre-deceased him in 2007.

I’m confident that Sendak’s diverse legacy will live on and enrich the lives of future generations, as it did mine.

MICHAEL BARNETT
Ashwood, Vic


Rabbis opposition to same sex marriages

DIKLA Blum (AJN 11/04) need be neither surprised nor baffled by the Rabbinical Council of NSW submissions (in consort with those of the Organisation of Rabbis in Australasia and the Rabbinical Council of Victoria) to the Senate and the House of Representatives opposing a change in the law that would recognise samesex marriage.

As a self-describing “mainstream” Orthodox Jew, Ms. Blum ought to be aware that the concept of homosexual marriage – and indeed homosexual relations – is incompatible with Orthodox, i.e. halachic Judaism.

Moreover since homosexuality is outlawed in the Noachide Code which is the basis of the JudaeoChristian ethic that has governed modern Australia since its inception, rabbinical organisations as guardians of that ethic have seen fit to fight to guard and protect that ethic.

Regarding the RCNSW’S use of the word “mainstream”, our president Rabbi Ulman has already clarified (AJN 27/04) that “by its very definition Reform/progressive theology deviates from the mainstream” and therefore it is an adjective we are fully entitled to use.

As for the representation issue: the rabbinic bodies in Australia purport to represent Torah and Torah values as is our mandate.

If this happens to conflict with the dogmas and mantras of the modern age which have turned some heads 180 degrees on this particular issue within a single generation, we the teachers of Judaism cannot be held to blame.

As it happens, I believe that were a survey of the opinions of the Orthodox community, and for that matter the wider Jewish community, to be conducted anonymously Ms Blum would again be surprised.

RABBI CHAIM INGRAM
Bondi Junction, NSW